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   25-Sep-18 

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If I learn sign language I’ll be able to help deaf people won’t I?
After decades of oppression and patronisation, Deaf people are emerging with a pride in their deafness and sign language, that demands respect and equality. In June 1999 a march for the official recognition of BSL took place in London, with a further protest planned for July 2000. BSL needs to be recognised as a language indigenous to Britain, on a par with English, Welsh and Scottish Gaelic, and its use should be widespread throughout the country as a means of communicating with the Deaf world, rather than seeing deafness as something that needs “help”. In addition, the relatively low incidence of childhood deafness (1 per 1,000 of the population) means that contact with Deaf people may be quite rare, a fact that some learners find discouraging. However, many Deaf people are now tutors of their own language and seek to encourage its use as widely as possible in the hearing world.


Author: DeafSign.Com
Date Published @ DS: 25/10/2000 



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